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York Heart & Vascular Specialists

OFFICE
York Heart & Vascular Specialists

We specialize in cardiology, electrophysiology and vascular medicine. Our team of cardiologists is specially trained in invasive and non-invasive cardiac and vascular procedures and brings many years of experience to our patients in the York community. We look forward to working with you and your referring physician to develop the best plan of care for your health. 

York Heart & Vascular Specialists (YHVS) is a member of UPMC Pinnacle Memorial’s Family of Health Services, a network designed to make quality health care available to people of all ages.

We are excited to bring our heart and vascular experts from York Heart & Vascular Specialists together with UPMC Pinnacle Hanover to provide a range of cardiovascular services to York and Adams counties.  Click HERE to meet our team and learn more about how we are working together to bring the quality cardiology and vascular care to you.

Fax: 717-718-9972
1600 6th Avenue
Suite 108
York, PA 17403 Get Directions
Hours:
Monday-Friday, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Showing 6 Doctors for this Office

J. Andre Garabedian, DO

Cardiology/Cardiovascular Disease

Hanover Medical Group Cardiology

717-637-1738

David M. Gilbert, DO

Cardiology/Cardiovascular Disease

Hanover Medical Group Cardiology

717-637-1738

Gagandeep Gurm, MD

Cardiology/Cardiovascular Disease

Hanover Medical Group Cardiology

717-637-1738

Ronald J. Savarese, DO

Cardiology/Cardiovascular Disease, Electrophysiology

York Heart & Vascular Specialists

717-849-5576

Gurpal Singh, MD

Cardiology/Cardiovascular Disease

Hanover Medical Group Cardiology

717-637-1738

Andrea Lauren Kilgore, PA-C

Cardiology/Cardiovascular Disease

York Heart & Vascular Specialists

717-849-5576

Initial Consultation

What can I expect to happen during an initial consultation? 

Prior to your scheduled appointment, an office nurse will contact you by telephone for a brief interview. You will be asked questions about your current symptoms (if any), your past medical/surgical history and medication list and any medication allergies. We will also remind you to bring your medication bottles with you the day of your visit. 

At the time of your office visit, please register with the front office staff. From there, you will be escorted into an examination room where your vital signs will be checked and your medication bottles reviewed. You will be asked to change into a patient gown. 

During the time with your cardiologist, pointed questions will be asked regarding any symptoms you may be having. Your prior history will be reviewed and a physical examination performed. Following this, the physician will make recommendations for care. Testing may be ordered and/or additional appointments scheduled. 

At the conclusion of your visit, you will dress and be directed to our check-out area. This is where all testing, procedure and follow up appointments are scheduled. If procedures are scheduled, you can expect a call from our office nurse approximately one week prior to your scheduled date. 

We would appreciate the opportunity to participate in your cardiovascular health. An initial consultation can be obtained by contacting our office directly or through a referral by your primary care physician. A referral form can be downloaded and printed directly from our website for this purpose.

Follow-Up Care

Follow-up care happens after an initial consultation, if needed, or as a result of a hospital stay. During this visit, your vital signs are checked, medications are reviewed and a physical examination is performed. We will ask you to bring your medications with you to each visit. If recent testing has been done, those results will be reviewed with you by the physician. Our office policy is to contact you regarding your plan of care within two weeks of testing. If new testing is necessary, schedules can be arranged at this time. For many patients, follow-up care with a cardiologist is only necessary once or twice a year. For others, it may be more frequent. Be sure to ask your caregivers how often visits are required.

As a convenience to our patients, limited laboratory testing can be performed at our office. Your blood specimen is taken at our office and hand-delivered to UPMC Memorial for the results. If there are any concerns about these results, our office will contact you, but please feel free to call us if you have not heard anything. It is our office policy to contact patients about testing results within two weeks. This call will notify you as to whether a change is required in your plan of care. High quality, effective communication about your healthcare is a priority for our practice.

Electrocardiography is a method by which the electrical activity of the heart is recorded. It is an important tool, frequently used by cardiologists, in evaluating the heart. There are a few methods by which this can be achieved in our office: A 12-lead ECG (electrocardiogram) is done by attaching multiple cables to your limbs and chest wall. The electrical signals from your heart are then transferred to a printed “picture.” This is a painless procedure done in a matter of minutes. 

Another way of recording the heart’s electrical activity is through holter monitoring or event recorders. These are also painless but involve a longer period of time. If you are curious about the details of this testing, please see the link under patient education/procedures and testing.

Patients who have permanent pacemakers, implantable cardiac defibrillators or implantable loop recorders require specialized, perhaps more frequent, office visits. Patients who have a device are seen in our device clinic and often a representative from the company who manufactured the device is also present. 

What happens during this visit?

Through computerized equipment, implantable devices are “interrogated” on a routine basis. Some of this may be done remotely from your home; however, it is necessary for an in-office visit at least annually. This testing is done through the use of a piece of equipment called a pacemaker programmer. A few ECG (electrocardiogram) leads will be attached to the skin. A sensor, which often looks like a donut, is laid on top of the device. This sensor is attached to the computerized programmer via a cable. This is a painless process and allows the programmer to “look at the activity of the device.” Special testing is done to ensure proper function of the device. During this process, reports are printed from the programmer and placed in your chart. A letter about the testing results is then sent to your primary care physician. 

What is remote monitoring?

Remote monitoring is a means by which the device can be monitored without leaving home. Depending on the type of device, this can be done in one of two ways. 

The first is called Transtelephonic or TTP. Using special home equipment and a regular home phone, signals are transmitted through a computerized system. This information is then reviewed by a technician and reported to your pacemaker nurse/physician. 

The second method is a wireless system. Using a home, remote system, devices are monitored wirelessly. Often times, this occurs while the patient is sleeping. Regardless of which method you choose, the necessary equipment is supplied to you by the manufacturer of the device

Click here to learn more about what UPMC Pinnacle offers for preventions of cardiac disease and keeping your heart healthy.

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