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Wellness & Prevention Newsletter Friday, August 01, 2014

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Pinnacle Health

Wellness & Prevention Newsletter Friday, August 01, 2014

Back To School

August. It's that time of year to get in those last minute summer trips and to start preparing to send the kids back to school. Here are some things you should keep in mind. 

Packing a Backpack


The American Academy of Pediatrics offers these suggestions to help reduce your child's chances of pain and injury:
 
  • Make sure your child's pack has a padded back and wide shoulder straps with padding.
  • Use the compartments inside the backpack to make sure it's well-organized, with the heaviest items toward the back.
  • Avoid overloading the pack. Don't exceed more than 20 percent of your child's body weight.
  • Make sure your child always uses both shoulder straps.
  • If your child must carry a lot of heavy books, see if the school allows a rolling backpack.

About Immunizations

Are immunizations safe?

Yes. All vaccines are fully tested before being approved for use by the FDA. Vaccines contain weakened toxins, or a dead or weakened form of the disease-causing virus or bacteria, which causes the body to produce antibodies that protect the child from that disease.
 

Diseases such as polio and mumps are rare, so why are vaccines necessary?

Many of these diseases still thrive in other parts of the world. Travelers can and do bring these viruses back to the United States. Without the protection of vaccines, these diseases could easily spread here again.
 

Don't vaccines cause harmful side effects, illness, and even death?

Some children have minor side effects from being vaccinated, such as a slight fever or swelling at the injection site. The risk for death or serious side effects is so small that it is difficult to document. Claims that vaccines cause autism or other diseases have been carefully researched and never proved. Rumors still persist that an increase in autism in children is caused by thimerosal, a preservative added to vaccines. Thimerosal, however, was removed from all vaccines in Sweden in 1995, and the incidence of autism has continued to increase there, as it has in the United States and throughout the world. After a thorough review, in 2004 the Institute of Medicine rejected the idea that vaccines had any relationship with autism. 


Looking for a Primary Care doctor? Click here to find one close to you and click here to view the location listings for our primary care offices.


 

Upcoming Events

Aug 24   Working Moms Network - Camp Hill GIANT
 
Aug 27    Heartstrings - PinnacleHealth Community Campus
 
Aug 27    Depression Support Group - Harrisburg

Symptoms of Dehydration


The following are the most common symptoms of dehydration. However, each individual may experience symptoms differently. Symptoms may include:
 
  • Thirst
  • Less-frequent urination
  • Dry skin
  • Fatigue
  • Light-headedness
  • Dizziness
  • Confusion
  • Dry mouth and mucous membranes
  • Increased heart rate and breathing

In children, additional symptoms may include:
 
  • Dry mouth and tongue
  • No tears when crying
  • No wet diapers for more than three hours
  • Sunken abdomen, eyes, or cheeks
  • High fever
  • Listlessness
  • Irritability
  • Skin that does not flatten when pinched and released

The symptoms of dehydration may resemble other medical conditions or problems. Always consult your doctor for a diagnosis.
 

Treatment of Dehydration


If caught early, dehydration can often be treated at home under a physician's guidance. In children, directions for giving food and fluids will differ according to the cause of the dehydration, so it is important to consult your child's doctor.
 
In cases of mild dehydration, simple rehydration is recommended by drinking fluids. Many sports drinks on the market effectively restore body fluids, electrolytes, and salt balance.
 
For moderate dehydration, intravenous (IV) fluids may be required, although, if caught early enough, simple rehydration may be effective. Cases of serious dehydration should be treated as a medical emergency, and hospitalization, along with intravenous fluids, is necessary. Immediate action should be taken.